MAIN
 ·ABOUT US
 ·JOB OPPORTUNITY
 ·GUESTBOOK
 ·CONTACT
 ·OUR BANNERS
 ·REPUBLISH
 ·CHANGE COLOUR
  NEW PW
 ·REPORTS
 ·INTERVIEWS
 ·WEEKLY REVIEW
 ·ANALYSIS
 ·COMMENTARY
 ·OPINION
 ·ESSAYS
 ·DEBATE
 ·OTHER ARTICLES
  CHECHNYA
 ·BASIC INFO
 ·SOCIETY
 ·MAPS
 ·BIBLIOGRAPHY
  HUMAN RIGHTS
 ·ATTACKS ON DEFENDERS
 ·REPORTS
 ·SUMMARY REPORTS
  HUMANITARIAN
 ·PEOPLE
 ·ENVIRONMENT
  MEDIA
 ·MEDIA ACCESS
 ·INFORMATION WAR
  POLITICS
 ·CHECHNYA
 ·RUSSIA
 ·THE WORLD'S RESPONSE
  CONFLICT INFO
 ·NEWS SUMMARIES
 ·CASUALTIES
 ·MILITARY
  JOURNAL
 ·ABOUT JOURNAL
 ·ISSUES
  RFE/RL BROADCASTS
 ·ABOUT BROADCASTS
  LINKS

CHECHNYA LINKS LIBRARY

May 12th 2008 · Prague Watchdog · PRINTER FRIENDLY FORMAT · E-MAIL THIS · ALSO AVAILABLE IN: RUSSIAN 

Twenty-first issue of the monthly Chechen Society Today released

PRAGUE, May 12 - The twenty-first issue of the monthly Chechenskoye obshchestvo segodnya (Chechen Society Today) has been released.

The opening news reports include an account of the presentation at Grozny City Library of a new book entitled "Famous Chechen Women", and a reminder that on May 5 this year the production of VAZ-2107 Lada cars begins in the Chechen Republic. A Kavkazskii uzel feature focuses on LiveJournal bloggers' debates about a video that was recently aired on the Internet, showing the seizure of hostages by Russian federal forces during the first Chechen war of 1994-1996. An article from the SNO human rights monitoring centre discusses the massacre of civilians by Russian troops that took place in the village of Samashki in April 1995, and explores the reasons why none of those responsible for the bloodshed have yet been brought to justice.

Articles and short features follow: a discussion of the problem posed by the large number of orphaned and semi-orphaned children in the republic; and an account of the opening of a new clinic to be run by Chechnya's Muslim religious authorities for the treatment of anxiety and depression among the populace - the goal is to counter what are seen as the "charlatan" methods of modern Western psychotherapy by substituting it with readings from the Koran, which the muftis consider a more suitable treatment for psychological ills.

Additional item in the issue include a survey of President Kadryrov's first year in office; an interview with Shamun Kagermanov, editor of the long-established Chechen newspaper Selskaya zhizn; an extended report on the recent founding in Moscow of a new Representative Council of Chechen Students, which aims among other things to raise the profile and reputation of Chechen youth; a celebratrion of the 70th birthday of the Chechen-Ingushetian film-maker Ilyes Tatayev; and a larger than usual selection of features on Chechen history and culture. The issue is rounded off by the sports pages, where one can find an account of recent Chechen achievements in the field of boxing.

Visit this page to see and download the issue.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The black-and-white Russian-language publication Chechen Society Today is a joint project of Prague Watchdog and the Moscow-based Center for Journalism in Extreme Situations, which is being implemented thanks to support from the US-based National Endowment for Democracy. The journal’s aim is to strengthen Chechen civil society, promote independent media in Chechnya, and provide objective information to Chechens living in Russia and Europe.

A thousand copies are published in Moscow; additional copies are printed and distributed by Prague Watchdog for Chechen exiles in Europe. In addition, a printer-friendly PDF version can be downloaded from the PW (http://journal.watchdog.cz) and CJES websites (http://chechnya.cjes.ru). Free e-mail subscription to the PDF version is also available.

Prague Watchdog welcomes proposals from both organizations and individuals for participation in this project, especially the distribution of the paper version of the journal.

 

(D,P/T)



DISCUSSION FORUM





SEARCH
  

[advanced search]

 © 2000-2017 Prague Watchdog  (see Reprint info).
The views expressed on this web site are the authors' own, and don't necessarily reflect the views of Prague Watchdog,
which aims to present a wide spectrum of opinion and analysis relating to events in the North Caucasus.
Advertisement